The Little Prince 2

8 03 2012

In The Little Prince, the fox and the prince have a conversation about what makes that one particular boy, or that one particular fox, or that one particular flower special.

In the end, the fox told the prince: “Here is my secret.  It’s quite simple:  One sees clearly only with the heart.  Anything else essential is invisible to the eyes.”

In your own words, what does that quote mean to you?  Apply it to your own life or other pieces of literature if you need to give examples in your explanation.

Be sure to type out your answers in complete sentences.  Be sure to back up your ideas with some examples, evidence, or proof.  Be sure to check back and see what other people say too.  Be sure to comment on what they say.

Your answer should be 3-5 paragraphs long and give examples from both The Little Prince and other places (other books, movies, the real world…)





The Little Prince – 2012

28 02 2012

The Little Prince has traveled around to a bunch of small planets.  On each of them he met one strange person, and almost all of those people made him think that grown-ups are pretty strange.  As we talked about in class, the characters in the book may be symbols that represent real people or groups of people in the real world.  The author may be using this story to tell us something about those real people by showing you these ridiculous characters in the book.

In the comments section below, share with the class what you think Antoine de Saint Exupery might be trying to say.  Who do the king, the vain man, the drunkard, the business man, the lamplighter, and the geographer really represent.

Be sure to type out your answers in complete sentences.  Be sure to back up your ideas with some examples, evidence, or proof from both the story and real life.  Your answers should be 3-4 paragraphs (each paragraph between 5-7 sentences).

Be sure to check back and see what other people say too.  Be sure to comment on what they say.  Part of your assignment is to comment on what at least 2 other kids wrote.  





Orphans in Literature

1 02 2012

For some reason, the world of literature is obsessed with orphans.  What’s their deal?

We read The Adventures of Tom Sawyer earlier in the year.  In that book Tom Sawyer’s parents are gone, and his best friend, Huck Finn, is growing up with no mom and a dad that’s never around.  Written just a few years earlier on the other side of the world, Oliver Twist is about an English boy growing up with no parents, and ever since, it seems like authors are a little obsessed  with orphans.

The Ousiders, set about 100 years after Tom Sawyer’s adventures, three brothers take care of one another after their parents die.  Another 50 years later, Harry Potter’s parents are dead before the story begins.  The list goes on – The Baudelaire children from A Series of Unfortunate Events, Leisel from The Book Thief, Heidi, Hugo Cabret, Peter Pan, Lyra from The Golden Compass, Frodo Baggins from The Lord of the Rings books, even Hansel and Gretel.

And the kids in books that do have parents, they always seem to have only one – Percy Jackson, Anand from The Conch Bearer, Katniss from The Hunger Games, Jeremy Fink, Oscar from Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Prince Hamlet, Jim Hawkins from Treasure Island, the kids from the Narnia books, and Opal from Because of Winn-Dixie.  

It even extends into movies and comics.  Luke Skywalker is an orphan, so are Batman, Superman, Spider-man, and Little Orphan Annie.  Then you have more of the one parent kids – Cinderella, Snow White, Nemo from Finding Nemo, Simba from The Lion King, Ariel from The Little Mermaid, and even Andy from the Toy Story films.

I’m sure we could come up with a million more answers, but first I have a question.  What is the deal with all the orphans?  Why are books and movies obsessed with them?

Answer in the comments section below.  Your answer should be at least a full paragraph, but maybe two or three.  You should then wait for other students to answer and come back and reply to what they’ve said.  You are required to reply to at least two other kids.  





The Big Wave 5

24 05 2011

To give you an idea of how the Japanese people work... The picture on the left is March 12, 2011 - the day after the earthquake. The picture on the right is just 6 days later.

Pearl S. Buck wrote The Big Wave more than 70 years before the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, yet there are so many similarities between what happened in the book and what happened in real life.

Often times “life imitates art,” which means that things often happen in real life just they way they’ve happened in a story, a book, a play, or a movie.  This might be one time when it’s true.

Think about what you know about Japan, as well as what you learned from the story about the Japanese mindset and their attitudes toward life and death.     Have your thoughts on Japan’s recovery from the 2011 tsunami changed since reading The Big Wave?  How?  Predict what you think will happen in the affected areas of Japan over the next year or so.

Be sure to type out your answers in complete sentences.  Be sure to back up your ideas with some examples, evidence, or proof.   Be sure to check back and see what other people say too.  Be sure to comment on what they say.





The Big Wave 4

23 05 2011

In The Big Wave, Jiya is put in a difficult position.  After his village is destroyed and his family killed, a rich old gentleman offers to adopt him.  With Old Gentleman, Jiya would have everything he’d ever need – a beautiful home, riches, the best education… however, when it comes time to decide, Jiya chooses to live with Kino’s poor family – selecting a life of hard work, no money, and wondering if there will be enough food for everyone.

Tell me in your own words why you think Jiya made the right choice.  Also tell me why he may have made the wrong choice.

Be sure to type out your answers in complete sentences.  Be sure to back up your ideas with some examples, evidence, or proof.   Be sure to check back and see what other people say too.  Be sure to comment on what they say.





The Little Prince 4

20 04 2011

We talked about The Little Prince for nearly two weeks.  While we discussed the story, we decided that we understand the story is about a little boy from a far away planet, two active volcanoes, one extinct volcano (but you never know), baobabs, a flower, a sheep, a king, a fox, a pilot, and a snake.  We also realized that the story is not about boys, planets, volcanoes (extinct or not), trees with funny sounding names, flowers, sheep, kings, foxes, any sort of airplanes, or snakes.

If The Little Prince is about all those things, but isn’t about any of those things… What is The Little Prince about?

Be sure to type out your answers in complete sentences.  Be sure to back up your ideas with some examples, evidence, or proof.  Be sure to check back and see what other people say too.  Be sure to comment on what they say.





The Little Prince 3

15 04 2011

In The Little Prince, the fox and the prince have a conversation about what makes that one particular boy, or that one particular fox, or that one particular flower special.

In the end, the fox told the prince: “Here is my secret.  It’s quite simple:  One sees clearly only with the heart.  Anything else essential is invisible to the eyes.”

In your own words, what does that quote mean to you?  Apply it to your own life or other pieces of literature if you need to give examples in your explanation.

Be sure to type out your answers in complete sentences.  Be sure to back up your ideas with some examples, evidence, or proof.  Be sure to check back and see what other people say too.  Be sure to comment on what they say.